Carrollogos

A blog about Law, Technology, and Music

My Photo
Name:

I am a Professor of Law and the Director of the Program on Information Justice and Intellectual Property at the American University, Washington College of Law and am a founding member of the Creative Commons board.

Saturday, November 30, 2013

Creative Commons Licenses 4.0


 http://creativecommons.org/weblog/entry/40768

After a significant international public consultation process spanning two years, Creative Commons has released Version 4.0 of the Creative Commons licenses.  This effort, led by Creative Commons General Counsel Diane Peters, and the CC legal team of Sarah Hinchliff Pearson and Kat Walsh, with significant engagement and input from the fantastic Creative Commons Affiliate community has produced a robust and elegant license suite that should serve the commons well for years into the future.

For details of what's new and why, I think Diane says it well here.

This is just a heartfelt thank you to Diane, Sarah, Kat, and to all of the affiliates and Creative Commons supporters who gave so generously of their intelligence, legal expertise, and good common sense to make the improvements we now have.  Working with this community of talented, dedicated lawyers who have kept the public interest at the forefront of their thinking has been among the greatest professional pleasures I have been privileged to enjoy.

Congratulations! ¡Felicitaciones! 御目出度う!Parabéns!  Herzlichen Glückwunsch!  تهانينا!
Gefeliciteerd! 恭喜Felicitacions! 축하합니다! Binabati kita! Félicitations! बधाई हो! Grattis! מזל טוב! Tillykke! Baie geluk! Hongera! Congratulazioni! مبارک ہو! Gratulerer! ขอแสดงความยินดี 
Gratulacje! Tebrikler! Συγχαρητήρια! Selamat! Til hamingju! Поздравляем! Շնորհավորում եմ!
Čestitamo! Onneksi olkoon! Gratulálunk! Xin chúc mừng! Blahopřejeme! Palju õnne! অভিনন্দন!
Вітаємо! Apsveicam! សូមអបអរសាទរ! გილოცავთ! Честито на печелившите! تبریک می گویم
Blahoželáme! Tahniah! ຊົມເຊີຍ! Vobis congratulor! अभिनंदन! Felicitări! Təbrik edirik! வாழ்த்துக்கள்!
Prosit! Алал да му е! Sveikiname! అభినందనలు! Ngiyakuhalalisela! Ndiyavuyisana nawe!
Kuttyktaimyn! Баяр хvргэе Asengamhlophe! Vadaiyaan! E ku ori ire! Imelu Nke Oma! Arahabaina! Comhghairdeas!

Labels: , ,

Sunday, November 10, 2013

Recent public speaking

Rather than post for each speaking engagement, I'm posting a summary of a group of talks with links.

From the most recent backward.

Engadget Expand NY - Know Your Digital Rights
Nov. 10, 2013
What happens when your cloud storage provider is seized by the government, goes bankrupt, or won't let you retrieve your data?






University of Pittsburgh - Open Access Policies:  Coming Attractions
Oct. 24, 2013
Discussing where we are in OA.
Video: http://uls-media.library.pitt.edu/openaccess/coscp10242013.mp4
Slides: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/19940/

Haverford College - Intellectual Property in the Academy:  Who Owns It?
Oct. 21, 2013
You'd be surprised.
http://www.haverford.edu/calendar/details/246991

Bucerius Law School (Hamburg) - Limiting Secondary Liability to Make Space for Innovation
Oct. 11, 2013
Safe harbors for Internet Service Providers are not just a means of allowing these services to exist.  They are part of a positive commitment to promoting innovation.  Although some aspects of notice-and-takedown need reform, the basic policy decision in the US and EU to limit copyright liability for these providers has been a resounding success.
http://ipcenter.law-school.de/conference/abstracts/carroll.html

American University Washington College of Law - Governance of the Internet: Spying and the Case of Brazil
Oct. 3, 2013
Discussion of revelations of NSA spying on friendly government leaders
http://us2.campaign-archive2.com/?u=358411e27b5e6aa5e77bfc9f2&id=675b2c6ab7&e=858854e56d

Oklahoma State University Constitution Day Speaker
Sept. 5, 2013
The Open Access Movement represents an embrace of free speech values.  Even though the Supreme Court will not require open access as a constitutional right, the goals of the movement align with the reasons for protecting the right to speak and the right to gain access to information.  This talk reviewed the constitutional relationship between copyright law and free speech and then explained how open access is consistent with both authors' rights and the freedom of expression.
http://www.library.okstate.edu/constitution/previous.html

Creative Commons License
Carrollogos by Michael W. Carroll is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.OneWebDay